February 14, 2012
Some 21,000 children die every day around the world

maplesyrupmoon:

That is equivalent to:

  • 1 child dying every 4 seconds
  • 14 children dying every minute
  • A 2011 Libya conflict-scale death toll every day
  • A 2010 Haiti earthquake occurring every 10 days
  • A 2004 Asian Tsunami occurring every 11 days
  • An Iraq-scale death toll every 19–46 days
  • Just under 7.6 million children dying every year
  • Some 92 million children dying between 2000 and 2010

    The silent killers are poverty, hunger, easily preventable diseases and illnesses, and other related causes. Despite the scale of this daily/ongoing catastrophe, it rarely manages to achieve, much less sustain, prime-time, headline coverage.

    (Source: globalissues.org)

November 27, 2011

Pilipinas For Sale - Irresponsible Mining in Surigao (Reporter’s Notebook)

PART 1 - http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=o8STQxdCruE&feature=related

PART 2 - http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=e9YokbCjZOQ&feature=related

PART 3 - http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=ZBaz3rKdLP0&feature=related

November 17, 2011

"The aphorism "The poor are always with us" dates back to the New Testament, but while the phrase is still sadly apt in the 21st century, few seem to be able to explain why poverty is so widespread. Activist filmmaker Philippe Diaz examines the history and impact of economic inequality in the third world in the documentary The End of Poverty?, and makes the compelling argument that it’s not an accident or simple bad luck that has created a growing underclass around the world.

Diaz traces the growth of global poverty back to colonization in the 15th century, and features interviews with a number of economists, sociologists, and historians who explain how poverty is the clear consequence of free-market economic policies that allow powerful nations to exploit poorer countries for their assets and keep money in the hands of the wealthy rather than distributing it more equitably to the people who have helped them gain their fortunes. 

Diaz also explores how wealthy nations (especially the United States) seize a disproportionate share of the world’s natural resources, and how this imbalance is having a dire impact on the environment as well as the economy. The End of Poverty? was an official selection at the 2008 Cannes Film Festival.” - 

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=pktOXJr1vOQ&feature=watch-now-button&wide=1

October 31, 2011
IRIN Asia | PAKISTAN: Sindh flood victims lack shelter as winter approaches | Pakistan | Children | Early Warning | Health & Nutrition | Natural Disasters | Water & Sanitation

“We can’t understand why no one will help us. Some rice has been handed out, but for the longer term we have no idea how to manage. All our livestock are lost, and our crops washed away,” said Marvi Bibi, 25, who sleeps in the open with her three-week-old baby girl. 

October 19, 2011
Why Inequality Matters

"Massive poverty and obscene inequality are such terrible scourges of our times - times in which the world boasts breathtaking advances in science, technology, industry, and wealth accumulation - that they have to rank alongside slavery and apartheid as social evils."

-NELSON MANDELA, LONDON, 2005

"From cradle to grave, a person’s  life chances are dominated by the extraordinary levels of inequality that characterize the modern world. A girl born in Norway will almost certainly live to an old age. If she is born in Sierra Leone, however, she has a one in four chance of dying before her fifth birthday. A Norwegian girl can expect to go to a good school, followed by university, and to be healthy and cared for right through old age. In Sierra Leone only two in three girls start school at all, and many drop out along the way, deterred by having to find ‘user fees’ levied by the schools or by the low standards of education, or forced to stay home to care for their brothers and sisters, or to go out to work to feed the family. Only one in four women is able to read and write. University is an impossible dream.

The extent of global inequality is breathtaking. The income of the world’s 500 richest billionaires exceeds that of its poorest 416 million people. Every minute of every day, somewhere in the developing world, a woman dies needlessly in childbirth or pregnancy, and 20 children are killed by avoidable diseases such as diarrhoea or malaria. Governments spend least on health care where the need is greatest.

Ending  inequality’s ‘lottery by birth’ is perhaps the greatest global challenge of the twenty-first century. And it is one that concerns all nations, since in a globalised world, poverty and suffering do not remain confined within borders, but spill over in the form of conflict, migration, and environmental degradation…

Moreover, inequality holds the key to the poverty that exists around the world. The idea of ending poverty is nothing new, but the difference is that the global economy now has the resources to actually do so. The twentieth century delivered extraordinary progress in health, education, democracy, technology, and economic growth. Each year, the global economy churns out some $9, 543 worth of goods and services per man, woman, and child - 25 times the $ 365 per annum that defines the ‘extreme poverty’ of a billion human beings. There is more than enough to go round.

According to the UN, $ 300bn a year would lift everyone on the planet above the extreme poverty line of a $1 a day.

That is just a third of each year’s global military spending.”

- SOURCE:” From Poverty to Power by Duncan Green

http://www.oxfam.org.uk/resources/downloads/FP2P/FP2P_BK_Whole.pdf


October 14, 2011

healthytowers:

another brilliant animated talk from RSA, Jeremy Rifkin on empathy, this is the future!

October 10, 2011
pulitzercenter:

An info graphic depicting famine in Somalia by the numbers shared by The Washington Post.

Seven hundred and fifty thousand Somalis may die of starvation this  year. That’s equivalent to wiping out every single person in Washington,  plus 150,000 more.

pulitzercenter:

An info graphic depicting famine in Somalia by the numbers shared by The Washington Post.

Seven hundred and fifty thousand Somalis may die of starvation this year. That’s equivalent to wiping out every single person in Washington, plus 150,000 more.

September 29, 2011
Consequences of poverty: the children who are killed

EXCERPT FROM John L,. Seitz’s Global Issues: An Introduction, Third Edition (2008; Blackwell Publishing) - emphasis mine:

"… in the early 21st century it was estimated that between 100 million to 250 million children lived on the streets around the world, with half of them in Latin America, and their numbers were rapidly increasing.

For example, it was estimated that in the Philippines in 1991 there were about 200,000 street children, while in 1999 the number had increased to 1.5 million. Forty-four million children (nearly half the present population of the Philippines) reportedly work on the streets in India, some of the children begging having been mutilated by criminal gangs to make them more pitiable.

Because of family poverty, greed, and the fear of AIDS there has been an increase in the use of children as prostitutes around the world, some as young as eight years old. In the early twenty-first century it was estimated that between 700,000 and 4 million children and women were trafficked across borders into the sex trade, often through coercion and abduction. Many faced high risk of HIV infection.

The Secretary-General of the United Nations presented a summary of the state of the children in the world in a report to the organization at the beginning of the twenty-first century: “to enable families living in poverty to survive, a quarter of a billion children aged 14 and under, both in and out of school, now work, often in hazardous conditions or unhealthy conditions.

They toil in urban sweatshops; on farms or as domestic servants; selling gum or cleaning shoes in urban streets; clambering down mine shafts; and - in distressing numbers - bonded or sold into sexual services.”

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September 28, 2011

construirenotrefutur:

OBJECTIFS DU MILLÉNAIRE POUR LE DÉVELOPPEMENT : OU EN SOMMES-NOUS DES 8 OBJECTIFS POUR 2015 ?


Objectif 1 : réduire l’extrême pauvreté et lutter contre la faim 

Proportion de la population vivant avec moins de 1,25 dollar/jour dans les pays en développement :

  • Référence 1990 : 42 %
  • Situation 2009 : 25 %
  • Objectif 2015 : 21 %

Proportion de la population mondiale souffrant de la faim :

  • Référence 1990 : 20 %
  • Situation 2009 : 17 %
  • Objectif 2015 : 10 %

 

Objectif 2 : assurer l’éducation primaire pour tous 

Taux net de scolarisation dans le primaire dans les pays en développement :

  • Référence 1990 : 81 %
  • Situation 2009 : 88 %
  • Objectif 2015 : 100 %

 

Objectif 3 : Promouvoir l’égalité des sexes et l’autonomisation des femmes

Nombre de filles pour 100 garçons dans le cycle primaire dans les pays en développement :

  • Référence 1990 : 87 %
  • Situation 2009 : 95 %
  • Objectif 2015 : 100 %

 

Objectif 4 : Réduire la mortalité infantile et post-infantile

Taux de mortalité des enfants de moins de 5 ans pour 1 000 naissances vivantes dans les pays en développement :

  • Référence 1990 : 106
  • Situation 2009 : 74
  • Objectif 2015 : 35

 

Objectif 5 : Améliorer la santé maternelle

Taux de mortalité des mères pour 100 000 naissances dans les pays en développement :

  • Référence 1990 : 480
  • Situation 2009 : 440
  • Objectif 2015 : 120

Proportion d’accouchements en présence de personnel qualifié dans les pays en développement :

  • Référence 1990 : 43 %
  • Situation 2009 : 58 %
  • Objectif 2015 : 90 %

 

Objectif 6 : Combattre le VIH/sida, le paludisme et d’autres maladies

Cas de sida chez les 15-49 ans dans le monde :

  • Référence 1990 : 0,30 %
  • Situation 2007 : 1,1 %
  • Objectif 2015 : < 1 %

Cas de paludisme pour 100 000 personnes dans le monde :

  • Référence 1990 : 106
  • Situation 2007 : 134
  • Objectif 2015 : < 106

Cas de tuberculose pour 100 000 personnes dans les pays en développement :

  • Référence 1990 : 367
  • Situation 2007 : 232
  • Objectif 2015 : < 367 (objectif atteint) 

 

Objectif 7 : Préserver l’environnement

Pourcentage d’aires protégées dans les pays en développement (PED) :

  • Référence 1990 : 6,9 %
  • Situation 2006 : 10,4 %
  • Objectif 2015 : 11 %

Pourcentage de la population ayant accès à l’assainissement dans les PED :

  • Référence 1990 : 41 %
  • Situation 2010 : 53 %
  • Objectif 2015 : 77 %

Pourcentage de la population urbaine vivant dans des taudis dans les PED :

  • Référence 1990 : 47 %
  • Situation 2009 : 36 %
  • Objectif 2015 : < 37 % (objectif atteint) 

 

Objectif 8 : Mettre en place un partenariat pour le développement

Aide Publique au Développement des 22 pays donateurs de l’OCDE (en pourcentage du PIB) :

  • Référence 1990 : 0,33 %
  • Situation 2009 : 0,30 %
  • Objectif 2015 : 0,70 %

Aide Publique au Développement distribuée par la France (en pourcentage du PIB) :

  • Référence 1990 : 0,35 %
  • Situation 2009 : 0,46 %
  • Objectif 2015 : 0,70 %

 

Sources : Nations-Unies, OCDE/CAD, UNITAID, FAO 

 

(via construirenotrefutur-deactivate)

August 8, 2011
"

Until such a time that the tides of the world are reversed: so that children never again starve in our stead, wars cease to be waged on our behalf, and the earth is no longer enslaved at our behest…

Until that time, until we see justice done, peace restored, hope realized, love reaching out at last… why should we shut up and rest?

"

August 5, 2011
life:

It’s that time of week again— here, photos that will inspire and captivate you: The Week’s Best Photos
Pictured Above: A doctor examines Mihag Gedi Farah, a 7-month-old child with a weight of 7.5 pounds, in a field hospital in Dadaab, Kenya, now home to hundreds of thousands of Somali refugees fleeing famine at home.

"But this crisis is about more than numbers. The statistics hide individuals, each one a child with a family, hoping that they will survive." (Médecins Sans Frontières)
It’s easy to see where one’s sympathies lie. This comes as no surprise in a world where the gap between rich and poor is widening, where millions starve while thousands die of heart disease and diabetes from morbid obesity.
If this still stings your heart, you know you&#8217;re human. And here they tell us to look away and not give a damn, precisely when we can do something about it&#8230; yet we choose not to. We are in the position to act - or at the very least, to care. 

life:

It’s that time of week again— here, photos that will inspire and captivate you: The Week’s Best Photos

Pictured Above: A doctor examines Mihag Gedi Farah, a 7-month-old child with a weight of 7.5 pounds, in a field hospital in Dadaab, Kenya, now home to hundreds of thousands of Somali refugees fleeing famine at home.

"But this crisis is about more than numbers. The statistics hide individuals, each one a child with a family, hoping that they will survive." (Médecins Sans Frontières)

It’s easy to see where one’s sympathies lie. This comes as no surprise in a world where the gap between rich and poor is widening, where millions starve while thousands die of heart disease and diabetes from morbid obesity.

If this still stings your heart, you know you’re human. And here they tell us to look away and not give a damn, precisely when we can do something about it… yet we choose not to. We are in the position to act - or at the very least, to care. 

August 4, 2011
inothernews:

THE LONGEST WAIT   In this image taken July 23, 2011, newly-arrived Somali refugees wait outside a registration center at the  Dadaab refugee complex in eastern Kenya, where the influx of Somalis  displaced by a famine remains high.  Refugees who arrive at camp receive a 20-day ration of food — although it can take up to two months to enter the camps.  (Photo: Tony Karumba / AFP-Getty via ABC News)

inothernews:

THE LONGEST WAIT   In this image taken July 23, 2011, newly-arrived Somali refugees wait outside a registration center at the Dadaab refugee complex in eastern Kenya, where the influx of Somalis displaced by a famine remains high.  Refugees who arrive at camp receive a 20-day ration of food — although it can take up to two months to enter the camps.  (Photo: Tony Karumba / AFP-Getty via ABC News)

August 4, 2011
"

"The world had an opportunity to save thousands of lives that are being lost in parts of Somalia due to the famine, if only the donor community had paid attention to the early warning systems that predicted it eight months ago.

'There has been a catastrophic breakdown of the world's collective responsibility to act. 3,500 people a day are fleeing Somalia and arriving in parts of Ethiopia and Kenya that are suffering one of the driest years in six decades.

Food, water and emergency aid are desperately needed. By the time the U.N. calls it a famine it is already a signal of large scale loss of life,’ Oxfam said.”

"

— Isaiah Esipisu, Horn Of Africa: Poor Attention to Forecasts to Blame for Famine in Somalia, Inter Press Service, July 21, 2011

http://www.globalissues.org/article/796/east-africa-food-crisis

August 2, 2011

jagree:

The Road to Traffik (by somalymamfoundation)

Please watch this and share it with others. 

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(via betrueandbrave)

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